Local Media Matters More Than Ever.

July 08, 2019

As CCTV celebrates 35 years of free speech, open government, media education, and preservation of local history, we hope that you will consider making an investment in our collective future by joining our “$35K for 35 Years Campaign.”

CCTV has changed the face of local media for more than three decades. With support from the community, we'll be able to expand these three initiatives:

  • Advocacy - The FCC threatens to change the rules and pull funding for public access TV, CCTV is working on local, state, and federal levels to protect community media and open networks. Together, with colleagues across the state, we are mobilizing meaningful opposition against companies that want to use our public property for even more private gain. The first meeting of the Vermont Legislature’s PEG Access Study Committee kicks off this month. With your help, we can continue to bring our experience to the fight for free speech and public access TV.
     
  • Media Education - CCTV and Town Meeting TV educate students of all ages to tell compelling stories and think more critically about how the media and the world works. Support our community youth to learn media production and literacy skills through summer camps, internships and hands-on TV making workshops for middle schoolers, community groups, and high school and college students.
     
  • Community Archives - Since CCTV’s inception in 1984, we’ve cataloged a treasure trove of stories about and by our community. From Bernie’s years as Burlington Mayor to today’s urgent messages about the opioid crisis, we house one of the largest media libraries in the state, preserving more than 35,000 hours and four decades of unique local programming. Help us to preserve -- and improve access to -- this unique insight into our shared history.

Together, we can assure that local media continues to matter. Learn more at www.cctv.org/donate

Featured Story

Alliance for Community Media says FCC Cable Vote Will Harm Local Media

The proposed rules would allow cable companies to assign market values to these benefits and then charge the amount back to local communities in most cases. Benefits include items like free cable subscriptions to schools, discounts for the elderly, and fiber connectivity to local government buildings like police departments, fire stations, and libraries.

Read more...

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